Even less intuitive

creative thinking
In a previous post I opined, more or less, that in design specialisms such as interface design, for example, any quest for some sort of universally intuitive solution is unequivocally doomed to failure. The reason for this, I argued, is that before any user of interface-driven devices  can get to grips with them they must, of necessity, call upon techniques, schemas and processes that they've learned, acquired or become familiar with in past engagements with similar - or even not so similar - devices. In short, users call upon experience and familiarity when faced with new interface challenges; intuition - "the ability to acquire knowledge without inference or the use of reason [1]"  - has no part to play in the process at all. Should past experience be of no use…
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Intuitive? Perhaps not

creative thinking
In the worlds of ergonomics and user experience design it seems that one of the most desirable of all outcomes - the golden ideal - is to conjure up a solution that, while it may be novel in concept to new users, is nevertheless rapidly and painlessly understood and absorbed by novitiates when encountered for the first time. This is especially true in areas where there is a strong commercial or life-threatening imperative. Such ideal solutions are not uncommonly described as 'intuitive'. But are they intuitive? Really? Indeed, is it ever even possible to design any truly intuitive interface at all? (Incidentally, shouldn't that be 'intuitable'?) The OED defines intuition as, "the ability to acquire knowledge without inference or the use of reason". In plain terms, intuition means that people…
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